Students Play Games or Watch YouTube During Online Classes | Be Korea-savvy

Students Play Games or Watch YouTube During Online Classes


This photo, taken April 9, 2020, shows Hwajung High School senior Lee Ye-ji taking online classes at her home in Goyang, west of Seoul. (Yonhap)

This photo, taken April 9, 2020, shows Hwajung High School senior Lee Ye-ji taking online classes at her home in Goyang, west of Seoul. (Yonhap)

SEOUL, June 5 (Korea Bizwire)More than 60 percent of middle and high school students have either played games or watched YouTube videos during online classes.

The Institute for Progressive Education conducted a survey of 560 elementary school students, 844 middle and high school students, 785 teachers, and 696 parents from May 20 to 26, which showed that students spent more time using digital devices during the online schooling period.

Roughly half of the elementary school students said they spend more time using digital devices than before.

While 51.2 percent of middle and high school students said there was only a small change in overall time spent on digital devices, 61.8 percent said they played games or watched YouTube videos during class.

One quarter of the elementary school students surveyed said they had difficulty concentrating during online classes, as well as 54.1 percent of middle and high school students.

The higher the grade, the less they were able to concentrate on their classes.

Close to two thirds of elementary school students and 49 percent of middle and high school students said they couldn’t concentrate because ‘there were no teachers around’.

As for what they like about online classes, 47.7 percent of elementary school students and 68.5 percent of middle and high school students pointed to the ‘freedom of time and location’.

As for their dislikes, 59.2 percent of elementary school students said they ‘couldn’t interact with friends’ while 58.8 percent of middle and high school students ‘couldn’t ask questions during class’.

Two thirds of the students were worried that online classes would negatively affect their grades more than offline classes.

Asked whether students suffering from financial or academic difficulties were being supported for online class, 58.6 percent of teachers said ‘no’.

Kevin Lee (kevinlee@koreabizwire.com)

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