False Chinese Claims Spur Korean American High School Students to Push for Korean Hanbok Day | Be Korea-savvy

False Chinese Claims Spur Korean American High School Students to Push for Korean Hanbok Day


This photo, provided by the Asian American Youth Council, shows its members who have successfully made a U.S. city introduce a commemorative day for the traditional Korean costume "hanbok."

This photo, provided by the Asian American Youth Council, shows its members who have successfully made a U.S. city introduce a commemorative day for the traditional Korean costume “hanbok.”

SEOUL, April 6 (Korea Bizwire)Korean American high school students in the United States have stepped up to take action against false claims by China that hanbok, Korean traditional attire, actually originate in China.

The Asian American Youth Council (AAYC), a youth organization active in the U.S., announced Sunday that municipality of Tenafly in the state of New Jersey has declared October 21 as Korean Hanbok Day.

The day was named to emphasize the fact that hanbok are Korean traditional garments, and decided to maintain the use of the term ‘hanbok’, a Korean word for ‘Korean traditional clothes’.

It is the first time for a foreign authority to designate a certain day to celebrate Korean hanbok, the AAYC said.

Korean American high school students stepped up to take these actions after being taken aback by false Chinese claims that kimchi and hanbok ‘originated from China’.

After learning about the controversy over kimchi and hanbok on YouTube, AAYC head Brian Jeon, 18, engaged with members to come with ways to address the issue, deciding that they would found a firm basis to show that hanbok are indeed part of Korean culture.

They believe that by promoting U.S. authorities to designate Korean Hanbok Day, it will serve as a strong basis to refute false claims from China.

The students sent letters of petition to local U.S. politicians, asking them to designate Korean Hanbok Day, to which Tenafly Mayor Mark Zinna made the first response, accepting their request.

The AAYC said they will continue to promote the designation of the Korean Hanbok Day to other U.S. cities.

Lina Jang (linajang@koreabizwire.com)

One thought on “False Chinese Claims Spur Korean American High School Students to Push for Korean Hanbok Day

  1. Yi

    Why not instead petition for an Asian American Day, to establish the fact that Asians originate in America? Anything goes, I guess, to undermine the overwhelming Chinese civilizational cultural influence on East Asia.

    Of course, it is no brainer that Hanbok did not originate in China. Yet, it is factual history that its designs were deeply influenced by Hanfu, which is arguably the “Mother of Hanbok”. To blatantly deny the inseparable ties to one’s cultural roots with the help of a warmongering Western power is nothing more than a childish affront to the core Confucian value of filial piety.

    Instead of recognizing the paramount historical value of Hanfu throughout East Asia, it is preposterously labeled a symbol of Han Chinese nationalism. This is evident of the prevailing Western illiteracy, concerning intellectual cultural understanding of East Asia.

    Why not petition for a Tibetan or Thai Buddhism Day? Why the cultural bias? Will that mean Buddhism originated from Tibet or Thailand? What ultimately does a Korean Hanbok Day prove? Nothing!

    Reply

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